The Foundation has now closed. This site is no longer maintained, and is for reference only. Be sure to explore the insights from our four year journey.

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Funding

We fund social start-ups in Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and the UK, as part of Launchpad - our package of support that provides funding, expertise and connections.

Amount given to our partners £1,632,751
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  • You Make It

    London
    UK
    Jun 2013
    in-progress
    £35,000
    Image for You Make It Ladies who L-Earn
    Image for You Make It Ladies who L-Earn

    Project Summary

    Project

    Ladies who L-Earn

    Background

    London is one of the most exciting , culturally diverse and creative cities in the world. It is also divided. In You Make It’s experience, they have found young women from a Black, Asian and Ethnic groups are less likely to have the confidence and network to unlock their potential.

    The Gist

    You Make It will connect 20 young women from less advantaged backgrounds with inspiring people in creative industries, to support them in finding their way into work or to start up a business. The programme will be intensive and include six months of mentoring, business coaching and the opportunities to test their products. By the end of the programme all, or almost all, of the 20 participants will have significantly progressed, achieving; secure, paid employment, full time education or having taken real steps to establish their own business ventures.

    You Make It will also develop a model that they’re able to replicate elsewhere in the UK.

    What Stood out for us?

    We love the intensity and quality of this programme, particularly as we think it will result in big changes for a group of young women from less advantaged backgrounds.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Ministry of Stories

    London
    UK
    Jun 2013
    in-progress
    £34,850
    Image for Ministry of Stories How funny is that?
    Image for Ministry of Stories How funny is that?

    Project Summary

    Project

    How funny is that?

    Background

    Children as young as eight are disengaging from writing, believing it is something they cannot and will not be able to do.

    The Gist

    Working with TV production company Bwark (responsible for The Inbetweeners) and writers within the community, four groups of six children will be taken through the creative process of writing and producing their own scripts for a comedy programme.

    The project will increase the young people’s motivation to write and improve their creativity in writing, in turn improving their attainment in writing at school. They will also benefit from improved confidence and communication skills.

    What Stood out for us?

    We reckon that this project will stand out from the crowd of things on offer for young people, and act as a good starting point to improve writing and creativity.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Balloon Kenya

    Nakuru
    Kenya
    Jun 2013
    in-progress
    £36,410
    Image for Balloon Kenya Balloon Nakuru
    Image for Balloon Kenya Balloon Nakuru

    Project Summary

    Project

    Balloon Nakuru

    Background

    Entrepreneurship is often identified as the most sustainable route out of poverty in Kenya, but few can get financial support. The limited support that does exist focuses on how to write a 20 page business plan, rather than encouraging creativity. This is a huge missed opportunity, especially when set against a thriving entrepreneurial culture where seemingly everyone sells something to get by.

    The Gist

    Balloon Kenya connects socially driven young people from across the world with budding entrepreneurs. They will start a locally owned version of their entrepreneurship programme, one that challenges people to disrupt existing markets. It will be highly practical and visual and demand that people test their ideas in the real world. The programme will create 20 new businesses, creating jobs for 100 people.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of helping two young social entrepreneurs and their start-up organisation to create a fresh approach to entrepreneurship support in Kenya.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • SafetyNets

    London
    UK
    Jul 2015
    in-progress
    £25,000
    Image for SafetyNets SafetyNets
    Image for SafetyNets SafetyNets

    Project Summary

    Project

    SafetyNets

    Background

    There are at least 80,000 people involved in sex work in the UK, and increasing numbers of them are young people. New research suggests up to 1 in 20 students may be involved in some form of sex work. They are at disproportionate risk of harm, facing the risk of violence and harassment whilst often mistrusting authorities such as the Police.

    The Gist

    SafetyNets is an app that will enable people involved in sex work to anonymously share tip-offs and warnings with others nearby instantly, securely and for free. Hundreds of young sex workers throughout London will be supported to install and use the app, reducing harm and sign-posting them to support services. 

    What Stood out for us?

    We think that SafetyNets is a really innovative yet simple idea that will help a particularly vulnerable group of young people who are largely ignored.  It also has exciting potential for scale both nationally and internationally.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Digital Disruption

    London
    UK
    Dec 2012
    in-progress
    £36,941
    Image for Digital Disruption Digital Futures: work savvy, web savvy
    Image for Digital Disruption Digital Futures: work savvy, web savvy

    Project Summary

    Project

    Digital Futures: work savvy, web savvy

    Background

    Young people in the UK live in a world where the internet affects how they learn and form opinions. Young people are often confident, but not always competent internet users, often lacking the ability to engage critically with digital media. Formal education struggles to fill this void.

    The Gist

    Digital Disruption will equip 20 young people in East London with digital judgement skills. For example, the ability to deconstruct propaganda, to manage their online footprint and to understand how search engines work. Once they’ve become savvy consumers of digital content, the group will develop and test learning resources that can be used by youth workers and teachers to improve young people’s digital judgment skills across the UK.

    What Stood out for us?

    A group of young people will help to solve a critical challenge that their peers face today and in doing so will maximise the potential of the internet for individuals and society.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Changemakers

    Malindi District
    Kenya
    Dec 2012
    completed
    £43,886
    Image for Changemakers Share the change!
    Image for Changemakers Share the change!

    Project Summary

    Project

    Share the change!

    Background

    Changemakers believe that values-based leadership would make the world a better place. In the UK, Changemakers has developed a 3 month leadership programme for young people, that brings out young people’s confidence to lead and builds awareness of their values and leadership style. They wish to run their flagship programme in other countries. They have prioritised Kenya due to its youthful population (75% are under 30) and high youth unemployment (70%).

    The Gist

    Two young people – one from London, one from Kenya – will redesign the Changemakers’ leadership programme so that it works for young Kenyans. The programme is likely to include a mix of training, coaching and real world leadership experiences. Working with a local charity, ten young people will be trained up to deliver the new programme in Malindi, eastern Kenya. Each will deliver the programme to ten people, thereby providing 100 young people with increased confidence, communication skills and resilience. Changemakers, meanwhile, will have a clear understanding of how to scale their flagship programme.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of helping Changemakers to adapt a successful programme to improve the leadership potential of young Kenyans.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Changemakers successfully piloted a new, cost effective and youth- led approach to delivering their flagship leadership development programme - The Changemakers Experience.

    Young Londoner Amanda and young Kenyan Joyce co-created the new programme in Changemakers’ London HQ before heading out to test their concoction in western Kenya. Working with local organization Malindi Education Development Association, 14 young people were recruited and trained to deliver the programme to 100 of their young peers in Malindi District, eastern Kenya. 

    As a result, the young participants reported increased confidence, sense of purpose and improvements in skills essential for work, such as leadership and communication. For Amanda, Joyce and the 14 young facilitators, the experience gave them a whole heap of skills to launch their careers.     

    One Thing That Happened

    Groups of participants created and led a “change” project to address an issue of importance for the local community.  One group transformed Malindi’s public park into a more attractive place for their community to enjoy. They recruited 100 members of the community and planted 150 tree seedlings and many more plants.

    One Thing For Next Time

    Changemakers discovered that things worked best when they had two young people running the leadership programme so that they could support each other. 

    One Other Way We Supported

    Forward’s digital marketing and data analyst guru, Jonathan supported Changemakers to drive more traffic to their website.

     

    Future Plans

    Changemakers aim to use their new, low cost leadership development programme to significantly scale their work in the UK and beyond.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Educate!

    Nationwide
    Uganda
    Dec 2012
    completed
    £45,956
    Image for Educate! Youth Business Accelerator
    Image for Educate! Youth Business Accelerator

    Project Summary

    Project

    Youth Business Accelerator

    Background

    94% of Ugandan youth live on less than $2 a day. Of those fortunate to attend university, 64% of graduates are unable to find formal jobs. Educate!, by providing A-level students with knowledge and confidence to start an enterprise, is providing a critical first step to a livelihood. However, the alumni of the programme are unable to use this to create growth enterprises as they struggle to access capital or to produce at a scale that would entice larger buyers.

    The Gist

    Educate! will support 100 of their high potential alumni to develop a business to provide them with an income and to create new jobs. The young people will be given the opportunity to start up a micro-franchise company. To support them, they’ll be offered training on the product, a start-up bundle of products, business training, a sector-specific mentor and a low interest loan.

    What Stood out for us?

    The project targets young Ugandans with the best prospects of becoming successful entrepreneurs and gives them a good start in their career, providing ready-made products and established markets.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment has meant Educate! now has a business accelerator programme for their alumni of their in-school entrepreneurship programme. During the pilot, Educate! supported 93 alumni to create a business or further develop an existing one. As a result, 41% of the young people were earning over $40 per month (the average wage in Uganda) and 20% over $100 per month. 

    Educate! identified opportunities for participants, with a particular focus on micro-franchises. They then provided training, ongoing mentoring and access to capital to help their alumni to grow their businesses. 

    Together, the businesses generated employment for 93 people and counting. Educate! alumni are now running businesses in various fields from a modelling agency to a film production company to a solar micro-franchise company. One young person established an orphanage and another a school. Take a look at Ernest's story about setting up his bakery, the first in his community.

    One Thing That Happened

    Educate! approached six micro-finance institutions to help students access the funds they needed to start their businesses. However, they were unable to lend to the young entrepreneurs, expressing concerns about young people’s credibility as borrowers. Not easily disheartened, Educate! responded by helping two groups of young people to create Youth Savings and Credit Groups, whereby youth save and borrow together, and lend to their members. Our funds were used to boost their lending pool. 

    One Thing For Next Time

    Educate!'s ambition encouraged them to offer support to a large number of young people but only using limited resources. In future, Educate! will be more focused, having their staff offer more intensive support to a smaller number of young people.  

    One Other Way We Supported

    Executive coach Deirdre Tidy has been supporting and advising Educate! on the development of their organisation. Deirdre wrote a blog about her experience spending 3 days with Educate! in their offices in Kampala.  

    Future Plans

    Learning from the pilot has been used to evolve the programme into the ‘Youth Business Experience’. Like the pilot, Educate!'s alumni receive access to opportunities, training, mentorship and financing. And, in return, participants are expected to teach parts of Educate!’s in-school programme (for a stipend). We're very excited that our invesment has enabled Educate! to create an impactful programme for their alumni.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Fitzrovia Youth in Action

    London
    UK
    Dec 2011
    completed
    £34,978
    Image for Fitzrovia Youth in Action Road to Success
    Image for Fitzrovia Youth in Action Road to Success

    Project Summary

    Project

    Road to Success

    Background

    30% of economically active 18-24 year olds are unemployed in Camden.

    The Gist

    Fitzrovia are piloting a 1 year football-based experiential learning programme. The project will enable 100 young 16-25 year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain experience, confidence and skills that will improve their employability and increase their participation in the local community.

    What Stood out for us?

    The fresh approach of using football to increase young people’s chances of securing employment.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment enabled Fitzrovia Youth in Action to test a new employability programme for young people built around football.

    45 young people participated in a series of activities designed to improve their employment prospects, structured around their involvement in an 11-a side league in Camden during the 2012/3 football season. 

    As a result, 37 young people reported that, through the journey, they improved vital work skills, including communication skills, problem solving and team working. Meanwhile, 37 young people reported that the project had improved the important mental attributes of self-confidence and resilience. One young participant had this to say about the project:

    “The project has changed the way I think of myself and kind of the way I am. More than anything, I've shown myself that I can commit to something for a longer period of time than I ever have. It's also helped to show me different ways to get ahead. Instead of just going the basic route of applying for jobs and hoping that I'll get a response the project has helped me learn that knowing people is key.”

    For Fitzrovia Youth in Action, our investment resulted in employability becoming more embedded within their organization and what they do. 

    One Thing That Happened

    After their weekly football match, the young players drew out learning from out on the pitch to their own personal development. For example, effective communication during the game was related to the importance of effective communication in the workplace. Take a look at this in action, meet Fitzrovia FC !

     

    One Thing For Next Time

    It is challenging to work with young people who have been involved in previous projects that have not met their needs. This makes it very important to inspire participants at an early stage of the value that the project will bring to their lives.   

     

    One Other Way We Supported

    We ran our own employability workshop Fast Forward for two groups participating on the Road to Success project. Forward’s HR specialists helped them map out a career path, find job opportunities and market themselves to future employers. Take a look at our blog to find out what happened at one of the workshops. 

    Future Plans

    As a result of The Road to Success project, Fitrzrovia Youth in Action have made their work to improve young people's career prospects their number one priority. Elements of The Road to Success programme will be built into other models of projects Fitrovia run, while other elements will be run as stand-alone projects.  

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Fight For Peace

    London
    UK
    Dec 2012
    completed
    £48,599
    Image for Fight For Peace The young offender progression folder
    Image for Fight For Peace The young offender progression folder

    Project Summary

    Project

    The young offender progression folder

    Background

    The London Borough of Newham has faced a growing problem with gangs, resulting in high levels of gun and knife crime. The situation is not helped by the fact that youth unemployment rates are twice the national average, while recent cuts to local services mean there are even fewer positive activities available for young people.

    The Gist

    Fight for Peace will help 30 young gang members and young offenders into education or employment. The programme will combine boxing and martial arts training with education, employability, youth leadership and tailored youth support services. Activities include an intensive 15 week learning programme that will result in the equivalent of 4 GCSEs, mentoring to help the young individuals to work towards positive life goals, and intensive support from a new member of staff dedicated to help them to progress on to employment, education or training.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of helping Fight for Peace to improve their model by placing more focus on helping their young people to progress into education, training or employment.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment meant that Fight for Peace was able to run ‘The Gang and Offender Progressions Programme’, supporting young offenders or gang members with extremely demanding needs, many of whom had been referred to Fight for Peace following unsuccessful referrals to other organisations.

    39 young people were engaged in intensive education and mentoring programmes, where they achieved higher level Maths and English qualifications, as well as vocational qualifications.  From this, 35% progressed onto employment, 29% onto higher education and 23% are still being supported towards progression.  A further 138 accessed one-to-one employability support from the newly appointed Information, Advice and Guidance Officer.  

    The mentoring programme is tailored to each person’s individual needs and had a transformative impact on the participants, resulting in them growing in confidence and openness to work with others, as well as drastically decreasing reoffending rates and involvement in gangs.

     

    One Thing That Happened

    One participant who has been involved in gangs and spent a lot of time in an out of young offender institutions began taking part in Muay Thai kickboxing after being introduced to Fight for Peace through his friend who also attended the Academy. Through this he became interested in the other support they have to offer. Within 12 weeks he gained qualifications equivalent to 4 GCSEs in English and Maths and joined the Youth Council, to help people by sharing his experience. He has now left his gang, regularly attends meetings with funders and other visitors to promote Fight for Peace and is working towards becoming a personal trainer.

    One Thing For Next Time

    When participants have particularly demanding needs, it highlights the importance of being able to be flexible and extend the support they are given beyond the planned lifespan of the programme.

    One Other Way We Supported

    Fight for Peace has been selected as Forward’s Charity Partner 2014, meaning that Forward staff will work to support them intensively throughout the year, by fundraising and providing them with a range of expertise.

    Future Plans

    One of the biggest challenges Fight for Peace has is not having enough capacity to cater for all the young people who want to attend the centre.  It now has funding to redevelop the current facility to create double the square footage available. The new and improved facility will provided much needed additional space including two new sports training areas, new classrooms and more mentoring rooms, meaning they can impact even more young people.

     

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Restless Development

    Kampala
    Uganda
    Jun 2012
    completed
    £33,042
    Image for Restless Development Linking learning to life
    Image for Restless Development Linking learning to life

    Project Summary

    Project

    Linking learning to life

    Background

    The vast majority of young people in Uganda are either unemployed or engaged in informal, low paid work, fuelling frustration and leaving them vulnerable to exploitation. Youth face multiple barriers to employment, such as poor quality education, lack of access to skills training and negative attitudes amongst employers.

    The Gist

    This programme will create and pilot a world class internship model to support young people move into employment.

    Through the pilot, 20 young people will be provided with high quality work experience and develop professional networks. The aim is to then embed the internship model throughout Uganda, providing this experience to thousands more.

    What Stood out for us?

    The significant benefits of bringing the voluntary and private sector together to support young people in Uganda.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Restless Development created and piloted a flagship youth internship model. 80% of the interns have secured work following their internship. And in a country with 80% youth unemployment, that's good going.

    It was so successful that it has been recognised as a high impact response to the challenge of youth unemployment. 

     Through the paid internship, young people developed skills and experience which put them in a much better position to secure work. Each intern was provided with employability training before starting their placement and ongoing support from a mentor at the company and Restless Development. During the pilot, 26 companies were mobilised to provide internships for 46 young people, 20 of whom were supported directly by our investment.

    One Thing That Happened

    Restless Development were smart. Rather than going off on their own to design and run the internship programme they did so with others. They built an advisory group, bringing together young people, the Ugandan Government, Federation of Ugandan Employers and several companies to oversee and guide the programme. By doing so, they created something that worked for their stakeholders and reflected the ground reality.   

    One Thing For Next Time

    A key feature of the programme was that the host organisation provide support to the intern, so that they can learn and develop. The quality of the support to interns from hosts was varied. In future Restless Development will provide hosts with more indepth orientations and set expectations more clearly.

    One Other Way We Supported

    Forward developers and designers worked with Restless Development to create Career Spark, a website to help young Ugandans secure employment. 

    Future Plans

    The success of the pilot enabled Restless Development to secure much larger funding from USAID to scale the programme. Restless Development are also considering whether they could harness this experience to provide recruitment, matching and mentoring services to Ugandan organisations employing young people.    

    Pictured: FICA Seeds interns, Kampala. Read more about what happened when we went to meet Uganda's interns

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • The Connection

    London
    UK
    Jun 2012
    completed
    £19,183
    Image for The Connection Your Say
    Image for The Connection Your Say

    Project Summary

    Project

    Your Say

    Background

    15% of the homeless people The Connection works with are aged 16-25. Mainstream homelessness services are often viewed by young people as too formal or irrelevant to their lives. In order to effectively engage this difficult to reach group, special targeted services are required.

    The Gist

    The Connection’s youth-focused ‘Your Say’ project will provide a platform for young homeless people to develop themselves whilst reaching out and benefiting other young homeless people.

    Through weekly group activities based around digital media, 40 young people will produce content for an interactive screen at the homeless centre – a future means of communicating their experiences and key messages to other young homeless people. The project will provide training, qualifications and opportunities for personal development.

    What Stood out for us?

    Young homeless people using the digital skills they've learned to help other homeless people.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    The Connection created and piloted a new digital learning programme for their young, homeless clients. 41 young people benefited from the weekly drop-in programme, where they learnt about IT, media and digital communications.

    The programme was designed to be accessible and relatable to the young people by incorporating elements of their homeless experience. Young people, for example, learnt to tell their story using digital photography, graphic design and animation.

    The informal and exciting nature of the programme enabled The Connection to attract clients they had not been able to reach before. In the words of one participant: "It seemed more interesting and fun than the other computer courses on offer”. The programme served as a stepping stone for them, with The Connection signposting them onto other services they offer, such as education and employment support. 

    One Thing That Happened

    A group of the young participants worked on a project to digitally map high incidences of gambling in London. As well as learning new skills, the project enabled the participants to reflect on their personal issues with gambling. When asked about this level of involvment, one young person said: “The discussions about gambling helped me to finally take up a position at a gambling rehab, something I had been offered before but I wasn’t ready. I’m almost there, I’m about 85% cured of my gambling habit.” 

    One Thing For Next Time

    The Connection found it difficult to collect evidence on the impact of the project on the young people's lives. In future, they will invest more time in collecting feedback and information from the clients throughout their involvement with the project.  

    One Other Way We Supported

    Forward IT whizz, James helped The Connection to install an interactive screen at their centre for the young people to create content to showcase their work and communicate information to clients.    

    Future Plans

    Inspired by the success of the pilot, The Connection will scale the programme so that many other young people will benefit and run digital workshops for their older clients. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Enabling Enterprise

    London
    UK
    Jun 2012
    completed
    £42,464
    Image for Enabling Enterprise Innovate IT
    Image for Enabling Enterprise Innovate IT

    Project Summary

    Project

    Innovate IT

    Background

    ICT education can be a wasted opportunity for young people; it focuses on developing technical competence in using basic Microsoft Office applications rather than seeing these as tools to be used for something bigger. 71% of students don’t see ICT education as useful in learning about computing. Students learn in isolation, or through fictitious scenarios. The role of technology as a driver of economic growth and innovation is often ignored.

    The Gist

    Working in collaboration with teachers and industry experts, Enabling Enterprise will design a new approach to teaching ICT in schools. This will be piloted with 100 students aged 14-16 across four challenging inner London schools.

    Students will create their own ICT-focused project in teams, building up not only their technical skills but also their wider enterprise skills and aspirations. The programme will have a high level of business engagement, including technology companies hosting visits for students.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of creating and engaging and inspiring way for young people to learn IT skills.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment meant that Enabling Enterprise was able to provide secondary schools an exciting new approach for IT teaching.

    267 students from four schools across London took part in Innovate IT, setting up businesses in small teams and using technology at every stage.

    As well as developing technical skills over the course of the year, students also improved in skills like problem solving, thinking positively and teamwork.

    One student said:

    We really enjoyed exploring all the software you could use to start up your company.  It made me realise how much potential there is in ICT – there are so many businesses working in tech at the moment. It also showed me the importance of teamwork – a company doesn’t work if it’s just one person sitting alone, you need to work together.”

    Having developed a full range of teaching resources for the project, Innovate IT can now been rolled out and used in schools across the country by teachers in their own classrooms.

    One Thing That Happened

    As students developed their businesses, they explored a range of technological tools and programs along the way. They documented their journey on blogs, turned their market research into spreadsheets and then infographics, and created promotional materials using Photoshop.   

     

    One Thing For Next Time

    When organisations are working with young people through other organisations (in this case through schools), it is important to be able to track impact effectively, which is more challenging to do with less contact time.

     

    One Other Way We Supported

    We ran six workshops for students from four schools at Forward. Students spent the day at Forward and tackled an enterprise challenge, supported by volunteers from Forward. Take a look at our blog to find out what happened during one trip. 

    Future Plans

    Innovate IT has now been divided into three separate IT projects, which slot into lesson time and have a different real life focus, placing the innovative and entrepreneurial nature of technology at the centre. We also supported Enabling Enterprise in creating an online sharing platform, meaning they are now able to share their teaching resources with schools more effectively. 

     

     

     

     

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Spark and Mettle

    London
    UK
    Jun 2012
    completed
    £34,971
    Image for Spark and Mettle Star Track
    Image for Spark and Mettle Star Track

    Project Summary

    Project

    Star Track

    Background

    Children from less privileged backgrounds don’t have low aspirations - they dream big too. The problem is the conversion rate of their aspirations. Several reasons prevent aspiration from becoming actuality, including high national youth unemployment and lack of soft skills development.

    The Gist

    ‘Star Track’ will provide 30 marginalised 18-24 year-olds with a chance to map out and pursue their dream career. The programme is personalised and the approach is balanced. It focuses on developing both the professional qualities needed to help secure a fulfilling job and other more personal qualities, like confidence and resilience, needed to be all-round happy in life.

    Two young people will each be paired with an ‘agent’ (a professional volunteering their time) who’ll oversee a mixture of remote online training and face-to-face events.

    Improving a young person’s professional skills and helping them to understand their own potential will give them the boost of confidence they need to go after the career they really want.

    What Stood out for us?

    The highly-personalised support that is provided through using the web as a force for good.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment meant that Spark + Mettle were able to run and evaluate their core programme Star Track.

    20 young people aged 18-24 were engaged in the programme, which coverts 1/5 of ‘just for fun’ internet time into productive time that can help them towards a career. Each was paired with a professional mentor, who they met every week for online mentoring sessions and who supported them throughout the six months. Alongside that, participants were supported in carrying out tailored assignments, building their skills and aspirations.

    Events were also held regularly, which brought participants together with a range of professionals, building their networks and providing great work experience opportunities.

    Prior to starting Star Track, Amy had a passion for writing but lacked the qualifications and confidence needed to turn it into a career. Spark + Mettle helped her get three work placements and connected her with prominent authors.  She is now studying for a BA in English Literature at The Open University, has completed her 5th novel and is about to have a short story published by her ‘dream publishers’. Amy had a few words for us!

    “Star Track has helped me. I believe in myself a lot more. My badgering the editor of the Huffington Post blog is something that is a direct result of Star Track. My sending multiple magazine submissions is a direct result of Star Track. The assessment day, the events, the hangouts and the meet-ups have all boosted me.”

    Take a look at Amy's story

    One Thing That Happened

    In the summer, the participants created an event called ‘The Jumpstart’, which was an afternoon of workshops and talks, targeting young people who—like themselves—had many aspirations, but not a clear idea of how to turn them into career prospects. Speakers included BBC journalist Alice Bhandhukravi, Yelp Community manager Alex Shebar and Discoverables co-founder Arfah Farooq. 

    One Thing For Next Time

    Recruitment is a huge challenge in our sector, particularly when there are so many initiatives targeting the same young people. Factors like what time of year it is can have a big impact on how much young people are likely to engage, with the summer holidays being a tricky time.

    One Other Way We Supported

    Spark + Mettle held an Assessment Day at Forward and we invited founder, Eugenie to events throughout the year, focusing on different areas which could benefit her work. They attended digital marketing workshops, and Nuts and Bolts sessions. We also helped in connecting them to peers in the sector and providing references to funders and other opportunities (resulting in £100k donation and founder Eugenie’s acceptance onto the Clore Leadership Programme).

    Future Plans

    Spark + Mettle are continuing to run Star Track as their flagship programme, building up the skills, aspirations and networks of more young people. They are also starting an intern programme to ensure that young people are at the heart of all they do, including the design of their work. Lastly, because our funding enabled them to hire a project manager for Star Track, this freed up the time of Eugenie, the leader, who has since gone on to launch Discoverables, an online platform that allows Spark + Mettle to reach a far wider audience, helping more young people discover their strengths, complete missions and develop the skills employers want.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • War Child

    Alcholi Region
    Uganda
    Jun 2012
    completed
    £49,985
    Image for War Child Growing young Entrepreneurs in Alcholi region, Uganda
    Image for War Child Growing young Entrepreneurs in Alcholi region, Uganda

    Project Summary

    Project

    Growing young Entrepreneurs in Alcholi region, Uganda

    Background

    Fighting has ended in the region, the Lord’s Resistance Army have left, but the legacy of the war remains. Many children now live in child-headed households and with disastrous levels of youth unemployment, young people’s prospects are bleak.

    The Gist

    This programme will target 100 young Ugandans, providing them with a combination of skills, inspiration and funding to set up a business that will enable them to successfully support themselves and their family.

    The process will begin with a local business expert leading a series of workshops, to help identify and instigate viable opportunities for businesses. 20 of the most promising ideas will receive a business loan and on-going mentoring, the other 80 will be provided with support to secure other funding.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of testing a different way to help young people to secure a livelihood in a harsh environment.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    War Child successfully tested a fresh approach to entrepreneurship. War Child recruited a business expert to run the programme. Branded KATI (meaning 'come out' in the local Acholi language), the programme supported twenty young entrepreneurs with novel and viable business ideas with a large, low interest loan and ongoing business advice from a successful local business person and the KATI team.

    KATI created businesses in various fields, including a fashion retail shop and computer centre. The businesses generated employment for 26 young people and are on track to paying back their loans. Take a look at the stories of KATI entrepreneurs', Eric and Lillian, for an insight into the impact of the project.   

    One Thing That Happened

    War Child ran Innovation Camps at the start of the programme to support 100 young people to create and develop novel, viable business ideas. 

    One Thing For Next Time

    Mentoring is a new concept for business leaders in parts of northern Uganda. In future, all mentors will be provided with improved training and greater support. 

    One Other Way We Supported

    Forward designers San and Zoe worked with War Child Uganda to create the KATI brand. 

    KATI team in Pader

     

    Future Plans

    The success of the project means War Child want to scale the programme. They aim to establish KATI as an independent entity, providing business support and loans to creative young people in Northern Uganda. 

     

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • It's Your Life

    London
    UK
    Jun 2012
    completed
    £36,140
    Image for It's Your Life It’s Your Future
    Image for It's Your Life It’s Your Future

    Project Summary

    Project

    It’s Your Future

    Background

    The relationship between poverty and low achievement at school is part of a wider cycle in which family disadvantage is passed on from one generation to the next. Young people from prosperous areas are 47% more likely to get five A to C GCSE grades compared to young people from deprived areas.

    The Gist

    ‘It’s Your Future’ will target 25 14-16 year olds who have been excluded from school and provide them and their families with a package of support tailored to individual aspirations and personal circumstances.

    The aim is to improve their education performance, build self esteem and prevent them becoming completely isolated from any sort of education, employment or training.

    What Stood out for us?

    The depth and breadth of support that’s offered to each young person and the transformative impact that this will bring.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our support enabled It’s Your Life to build a tailored package of support to turn around the lives of 25 pupils aged between 14 and 16 from Tower Hamlets who were struggling academically and involved in anti-social behavior.

    85% of people on the programme received at least 5 A-C grades. All demonstrated greater confidence and self-esteem. All school leavers secured a place at college or an apprenticeship.  

    A dedicated and high quality mentor provided a single point of contact for the young people and built a programme around their lives to meet their individual needs. Participants received intensive education support, professional help to address specific issues, trips to places outside of their ‘normal world’ and coaching to help set their future path.

    Here's what one participant had to say about his experience: 

    I had been excluded from school twice for my behaviour. I had given up on going to school and my education and was predicted all U’s in my GCSE’s. Working with them this last year has meant that I was able to get back on track with my GCSE’s and I sat all my exams, something that I thought I would never achieve. I am now going to college to study BTEC Sport.”

    One Thing That Happened

    It’s Your Life believes that the biggest reason for the success of the project was the involvement of the families of the young people. Before taking part in the project, the young people's families are made aware of what the project aspires to do. And throughout the project It’s Your Life help families to provide the best possible support to the young people. 

    One Thing For Next Time

    In future, It’s Your Life will aim to run the programme outside of the school grounds to help the young people distinguish between school and the programme.

    One Other Way We Supported

    Through workshops that we've run we’ve helped It’s Your Life to improve their understanding of digital marketing and how to drive traffic to their website.  

    Future Plans

    Before our investment It’s Your Life had only worked in one school. This project has enabled It’s Your Life to prove their model works at other schools and increase their visibility. They now plan to scale their work across more schools in the UK.  

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • War Child

    Nationwide
    Central African Republic
    Feb 2012
    in-progress
    £100,000
    Image for War Child Fighting War Aftermath
    Image for War Child Fighting War Aftermath

    Project Summary

    Project

    Fighting War Aftermath

    Background

    The Central African Republic has been affected by violence for decades and is one of the least developed countries in the world. Much of the country remains beyond the control of the government. Rebel groups (including the notorious Lord’s Resistance Army) abduct children and force them to serve as child soldiers, with killings, beatings and sexual violence commonly used to terrorise communities.

    The Gist

    This project will transform the fortunes of young people who have been abducted, displaced, or are survivors of sexual violence. They will be trained and receive apprenticeships that will equip them with the skills to start a livelihood.

    Training will be run by adults from displaced communities who have the skills but lack the tools and materials, because of the war, to run their businesses and train others. Literacy classes will also be run, for young peo"ple who have missed out on their education.

    What Stood out for us?

    The two layers of impact; rebuilding an old livelihood will also facilitate the creation of a new one. This project was chosen by the staff of our founder, Forward. They chose War Child to be their Charity of the Year and will focus their fundraising efforts on this project. The Forward Foundation will match what they raise.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • LivelyHoods

    Nairobi
    Kenya
    Dec 2011
    completed
    £20,335
    Image for LivelyHoods LivelyHoods: Forward Expansion
    Image for LivelyHoods LivelyHoods: Forward Expansion

    Project Summary

    Project

    LivelyHoods: Forward Expansion

    Background

    High youth unemployment leaves over 400,000 slum youth barely surviving on the streets of Nairobi, Kenya.

    The Gist

    This project will create sales agents jobs for 40 marginalised youths in the urban slums of Kangemi, and give 4,800 slum consumers access to affordable and socially beneficial products such as solar lamps.

    The idea is that the young people will not only earn a stable income, they will receive skills, positive attitudes and confidence. The project is also a good opportunity for Livelyhoods to prove that the project is fit for rapid expansion.

    What Stood out for us?

    The fresh approach of finding young people living in a tough world and helping them become agents of change for their community

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Livelyhoods trained and employed 53 young people, generated over £20,000 in sales revenue and impacted the lives of close to 5,000 individuals through the sale of life-changing products.

    An iSmart sales agent has an improved opportunity to get higher paid formal jobs and/or start a business. They’ve been part of a supportive social network, encouraged to start being future focused, been able to gain professional sales skills, improve their confidence and self-direction and learn about accountability and responsibility.

    Livelyhoods have also now proved they can operate at scale. Here's what Livelyhoods Co-founder, Maria Springer had to say:

    “The Forward Foundation was our second institutional funder, and whereas they were previously considered ‘risky’, the Forward Foundation’s support has enabled us to attract funding from five additional institutional partners.”

    One Thing That Happened

    Livelyhoods ran 16 inspirational sales sessions for young people between the age of 18-35. These ran over the course of 16 weeks and included marketing and sales training.

    One Thing For Next Time

    Livelyhoods would ensure their training is motivational but not profitable for participants, and make sure that all agents are aware of that iSmart is a full time, serious role. 

    One Other Way We Supported

    In February 2013 we sent Executive Coach, Deirdre Tidy out to give them some organisational advice. Read Deidre's blog to see what happened. 

    Future Plans

    Livelyhoods plan to open additional iSmart stores in other slum communities, employing more youth, selling more products and getting themselves closer to financial sustainability.  

     

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Youth Business International

    Nationwide
    Uganda
    Dec 2011
    completed
    £49,950
    Image for Youth Business International Starting Youth Business Uganda
    Image for Youth Business International Starting Youth Business Uganda

    Project Summary

    Project

    Starting Youth Business Uganda

    Background

    There is an 80% youth unemployment rate.

    The Gist

    Youth Business International want to establish an operation that will support young people in need to set up and run a businesses with a combination of training, volunteer business mentoring and access to capital. The new programme hopes to support 200 young people by the end of 2013.

    By providing support to overcome these common obstacles to starting up in business, it will enable young people to develop a sustainable livelihood for themselves and their families. They will also create jobs for others and stimulate economic development in their communities. This is a long term initiative that will continue to support Ugandans for years to come.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of helping Youth Business International take a highly effective model to a new country whose young people are in need of support.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Youth Business International identified and partnered with Enterprise Uganda to establish for young Ugandans an integrated entrepreneurship programme involving; training, finance and mentoring. As well as establishing this partnership, our investment focused on developing a scalable mentoring programme. 

    During the pilot, 101 young entrepreneurs were matched with a volunteer business mentor, receiving free business development support from an experienced professional.

    The young entrepreneurs were able to draw on the wisdom of their mentors to improve their businesses.Young entrepreneurs like Emmanuel. Emmanuel runs a fast growing motorbike mechanic garage, now employing 30 people. This is what he had to say about his mentoring experience: “I know I couldn’t be [where I am today] without having my mentor, it is a new experience and I always look forward to another mentoring session.” 

    One Thing That Happened

    Enterprise Uganda found it difficult to recruit mentors, mainly because there isn't a culture of mentorship in Uganda. In response, they innovated the mentor model, and introduced 'group mentoring' for some youth, where a small number of entrepreneurs meet with one mentor. Such was it's success, Youth Business International are exploring whether this could be adapted in other countries in which they work. 

    One Thing For Next Time

    There were few female mentors on the pilot, partly due to cultural reasons. In future, Enterprise Uganda will dedicate more time and effort to attracting women to become mentors. 

    One Other Way We Supported

    Developers and designers of our founder, the Forward Internet Group, supported Youth Business International to improve their website

     

    Future Plans

    Youth Business International and Enterprise Uganda were able to leverage our support to secure a signifcant investment from the UK's Department for International Development. This will mean 10,500 young people will receive entrepreneurship support in Northern Uganda over the next 3 years. We're looking forward to hearing many stories of young entrepreneurs changing their lives and those around them through business.      

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Mac UK

    London
    UK
    Dec 2011
    completed
    £34,249
    Image for Mac UK Mini MAC
    Image for Mac UK Mini MAC

    Project Summary

    Project

    Mini MAC

    Background

    In recent months, the Gospel Oak area of London has seen a steep rise in serious youth violence. Those at risk of offending often have complex mental health needs.

    The Gist

    Mini MAC takes youthled mental health promotion into Schools, Pupil Referral Units and Young Offender Institutions through lyric writing, DJing and beat making. Part of MAC UK, Mini MAC Tutors are young people who’ve turned their lives around and are now teaching others how to DJ and MC. Their purpose is to address mental health issues, encourage discussion around topics such as street gangs, increase confidence, promote self-esteem through the learning of new skills. The big aim is to create a youth owned social enterprise that takes Mini MAC to schools and prisons across the UK.

    What Stood out for us?

    The impact Mini Mac will have on hard to reach people of a young age, and the prospect of making this sustainable.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment enabled MAC-UK to deliver two projects related to their peer led music project, Mini MAC.

    First, MAC-UK ran Mini MAC at Haverstock School in Camden for seven ‘at risk’ young people. Each developed their self-esteem, confidence and creativity along the way. The learning generated, including the lower than expected number of participants, fed into the second project. Meet Mini MAC Tutor, Dreamer who was involved in this.

    Second, MAC-UK prepared for Mini MAC to become a social enterprise led by young people. The three young Mini MAC founders worked with a serial social entrepreneur to conduct a feasibility study which verified the potential to expand the music project.

    Building blocks for scale were put in place, including a business plan, market opportunities and a team of seven young people to run the programme. Critically, our funding enabled MAC-UK to secure over £200,000 in investment to grow the social enterprise.  

    One Thing That Happened

    The three young Mini MAC founders received psychological based mentoring and supervision, leading to substantial improvements in reliability, levels of responsibility, increased business awareness and financial literacy. 

     

     

    One Thing For Next Time

    Mini MAC would benefit from being able to more clearly evidence the impact the project has on young lives. 

    One Other Way We Supported

    We built MAC-UK this shiny new website! 

    Future Plans

    A 12 month “expansion pilot” for Mini MAC is now running. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Foyer Federation

    London
    UK
    Dec 2011
    completed
    £40,460
    Image for Foyer Federation Working Assets
    Image for Foyer Federation Working Assets

    Project Summary

    Project

    Working Assets

    Background

    A lot of young people entering London Foyers are yet to develop the ‘assets’ required to secure employment. Many also feel estranged from their local community.

    The Gist

    Foyer intend to engage around 40 young people in creating and running an activity that develops their local community, promotes the image and reputation of young people and enables young people to build the sort of ‘assets’ that will improve their employment outlook.

    Working assets is a proven model that develops personal skills and resources, such as confidence and professional networks. 70% of the young people will demonstrate significant progression in achieving their education and employability goals.

    What Stood out for us?

    The depth and breadth of ‘assets’ that the young people will develop, and the potential to transform the way they are viewed by their community.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment enabled the Foyer Federation to pilot an enterprise element to Working Assets, one of their flagship programmes.

    Four groups, totally 27 young people were supported to create an enterprise project that benefited their local community. By the end of the project, four small enterprises had been built - a tee-shirt company conveying social issues; a pedalo hire scheme; a mobile beauty service for elderly people, and; a Valentine’s Ball for their local community.

    As a result of the project, over 70% of the young participants reported that they had developed key “assets” that would help them to secure work, including skills such as creativity, responsibility and leadership.

    Our investment also enabled the Foyer Federation to develop “thresholds” which young people need to cross on their journey to employment – where the bar lies for the different skills employers seek. This has since become a key feature of Foyer’s alternative job centre, “Pop Up Talent”.     

    One Thing That Happened

    Vision Tees, the tee-shirt enterprise, were chuffed to bits to open a stall at Spitalfields Market in June 2013. Check out our blog for photos of their opening day.

    One Thing For Next Time

    The project was delivered in four locations by staff from different local organisations. Foyer reckon that improving the support provided to the staff on the ground would help future projects.     

    One Other Way We Supported

    We ran an entrepreneurship workshop for the young people, sharing Forward’s wisdom and practical tools to help them to develop their business ideas.      

    Future Plans

    The programme we funded will evolve into a 12 week employability programme, the “Pop Up Talent Generator”, which will provide young people with the skills and experience to benefit from the “Pop Up Talent Shop.”   

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Only Connect

    London
    UK
    Dec 2011
    completed
    £36,734
    Image for Only Connect Prevent Youth Crime (Camden) Project
    Image for Only Connect Prevent Youth Crime (Camden) Project

    Project Summary

    Project

    Prevent Youth Crime (Camden) Project

    Background

    There has been a high level of youth conflict and violence in South Camden in recent months.

    The Gist

    The project will set out to engage 30 of the hardest to reach young people in Camden and provide them with arts based training and development opportunities to enhance employability and equip them to help prevent youth crime in the next generation.

    The target is for 21 young people to achieve a level 1 NVQ qualification for their work at Only Connect or be in education, paid or voluntary employment, or training within 6 months of joining.

    What Stood out for us?

    Having peers - ex-offenders and former young people at risk of crime - delivering the project.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Our investment enabled Only Connect to successfully test a new, holistic way of supporting young ex-offenders and youth at risk of turning to crime.  

    Supported by a dedicated “key worker”, 37 young people participated in a range of tailored activities, including creative opportunities (e.g. drama), counseling, advice around things like housing, and support into education and employment.

    As a result, 35 young people benefited from some form of education or training, while a rather impressive 21 young people secured employment. More broadly, most of the young people who took part achieved positive long-term change in their lives.

    In the words of one participant;

    I never thought in all honesty that I could achieve so much. This project is the best thing I’ve done in my life so far. It’s given me a new outlook on life, confidence and self-esteem. I feel I’m worth something now.”

    One Thing That Happened

    Every participant of the project automatically became a “member” of Only Connect’s community. For many this meant that, for the first time in their lives, they were part of positive community. The young members joined in social events and activities, such as a weekly dinner and debate.

    One Thing For Next Time

    A key reason for the success of the project was having one “key worker” with whom the young people interacted with on all matters. Given both the young people’s background and the intensity of support provided, an important lesson learned was to limit the number of young people key workers will support.

    One Other Way We Supported

    Over the course of one cold weekend in January we (and several others) supported Only Connect to come up with a new way of communicating themselves and an approach to attracting company’s support. Take a look at what happened on our blog.

    Future Plans

    Now that Only Connect has successfully proved that their holistic model of supporting youth works, they'll aim to scale the programme up. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • The Big House

    Hackney
    UK
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £30,065
    Image for The Big House Open House Project
    Image for The Big House Open House Project

    Project Summary

    Project

    Open House Project

    Background

    Each year, 90,000 children are in care. When they turn 18 and are no longer eligible for care, they are vulnerable to homelessness, unemployment and mental and emotional difficulties. The Big House is a new charity that provides a creative, structured environment to help young people leaving care make the difficult transition from ‘looked after’ child to living independently.

    The Gist

    The Open House Project will take 15 young care leavers through a 12-week intensive, personalised project, with workshops dictated by participants' needs. It will foster personal growth and mental wellbeing through an approach that combines drama therapy, development of life skills, literacy, mentoring and links to relevant opportunities. 

    A professional playwright will run writing workshops, working with participants to develop a script for a production using their words and real-life stories, resulting in a play of contemporary relevance. The participants will then perform the play at an established theatre in front of a public audience.

    What Stood out for us?

    Care leavers are a largely ignored group, with hardly any interventions focusing solely on them. The impact of the pilot they ran in 2013 on individual care leavers was tranformative, and we now want to help them establish themselves as an organisation.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Hao2.eu

    London
    UK
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £36,889
    Image for Hao2.eu GetSetGo
    Image for Hao2.eu GetSetGo

    Project Summary

    Project

    GetSetGo

    Background

    Young people with autism face discrimination; less than 15% in the UK are employed compared to 40% of disabled people. They often lack the confidence and communications skills to engage effectively with traditional offerings, and don’t reach their potential.

    The Gist

    GetSetGo will enable 40 young people to support each other in gaining the confidence, knowledge and skills they need to get and sustain work, in an environment that they feel comfortable in. Each person will have a 3D avatar and the group will interact through a user-led 3D virtual world. 

    Supporting each other, and with the help of a mentor, they will work towards achieving goals by participating in immersive 3D collective learning experiences accessed flexibly from home or from access points in their local community.

    What Stood out for us?

    Using innovative methods of interaction to give young people with autism a better chance at starting a fulfilling career.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Latimer

    London
    UK
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £46,946
    Image for Latimer Hidden Talents Lab
    Image for Latimer Hidden Talents Lab

    Project Summary

    Project

    Hidden Talents Lab

    Background

    There are over one million unemployed young people in the UK. Young BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) talents are under-represented in the media industry, even though with no official training or business support, they're attracting huge audiences across platforms like YouTube. Latimer co-creates cutting edge media campaigns with young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, giving them the skills and networks to get into the creative industries.

    The Gist

    The Hidden Talent Lab will nurture the skills, business acumen and online presence of 12 BAME talents for 12 months.  Through paid work on over 20 campaigns, they’ll gain invaluable experience and learn how to make money from their skills. They’ll also be given space to work full time in Latimer’s office, all the equipment needed to create digital media campaigns and a top industry mentor. The ‘Hidden Talents model’ will be widely promoted so that more young people will be taken on by the creative industries.

    What Stood out for us?

    The intensive support these 12 young people will get, and the likelihood that the project will lead them directly into an exciting, fulfilling career. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Fluency

    Hackney and Islington
    UK
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £37,810
    Image for Fluency Fluency Lab
    Image for Fluency Fluency Lab

    Project Summary

    Project

    Fluency Lab

    Background

    Firstly, there are over one million unemployed young people in the UK who need skills and work experience. There’s also more competition than ever for jobs. Secondly, there are many small businesses who need to establish a web presence but lack the digital know-how or resources. Fluency are exploring how the two can be a solution for each other.

    The Gist

    Fluency will recruit 30 disadvantaged young people and teach them in-demand digital marketing and employability skills through an online and offline programme. Having developed a digital portfolio they will then be connected with small businesses through a jobs platform, to take on paid digital jobs that the businesses are not equipped to handle in-house.

    What Stood out for us?

    Piloting an innovative, sustainable method of creating opportunities for young people and creating a more tech savvy generation.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Product of Prison

    Nationwide
    Uganda
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £40,200
    Image for Product of Prison Skills to freedom
    Image for Product of Prison Skills to freedom

    Project Summary

    Project

    Skills to freedom

    Background

    Life in Ugandan prisons is unbearably hard. Young prisoners face overcrowding and poor living conditions. After release, young people have difficulties returning home because of the stigma attached to prison. With no rehabilitation programmes during detention, young people have little opportunities of finding employment after release and are at risk of social exclusion and poverty.

    The Gist

    Product of Prison will do four things. Firstly, they'll develop a hairdressing salon in Lira Women’s Prison to provide young female prisoners with skills, work experience and earnings to build a livelihood after prison. Secondly, they'll develop a tailoring centre in Gulu to offer temporary employment to newly released prisoners to ease their transition back to the community. Thirdly, they'll integrate employment and social skills into all their projects to improve prisoner's prospects after prison. Fourthly, they'll create a stronger team to support their work, including recruiting a Business Development Manager to secure greater funding and increase income generated by the organisation’s products (made by prisoners). 

    What Stood out for us?

    In a country where there's little rehabilitation within prisons, we were excited by the prospect of helping an emerging organisation to provide young prisoners with the the tools to re-enter society and avoid reoffending.  

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Tumaini

    Eldoret
    Kenya
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £25,649
    Image for Tumaini Green Biz
    Image for Tumaini Green Biz

    Project Summary

    Project

    Green Biz

    Background

    Over 3,000 children and youths live on the streets of Eldoret in western Kenya. Most have poor physical and mental health. Glue and other drug abuse has become a survival tool, reducing appetite, making the cold nights bearable and giving confidence to beg.

    The Gist

    Tumaini will create a waste recycling social enterprise, Green Biz, to provide work for 60 young people living on the streets. Young people will collect waste items from Eldoret’s dump sites and sell to Green Biz. Young people employed by Green Biz will shred plastic into small chips, compress waste into bales and crush glass before selling to manufacturers across Kenya. The enterprise serves as a platform to help young people access further opportunities.                                                                   

    What Stood out for us?

    After a year the social enterprise becomes self-sustaining, meaning Tumaini won't need other's help to continue and grow the impactful programme.    

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Bigga Fish

    London
    UK
    Jun 2013
    in-progress
    £50,000
    Image for Bigga Fish Springboard
    Image for Bigga Fish Springboard

    Project Summary

    Project

    Springboard

    Background

    Resources are needed that bridge the gap between the digital experience for young people out of school and their learning in the classroom.

    The Gist

    Bigga Fish will work with 10-20 young people to develop and promote digital learning products that help secondary school students, particularly those who feel alienated by traditional methods, to revise. These resources will be piloted with 500 students in six schools, before being promoted more widely in Autumn 2014.

    What Stood out for us?

    The possibility of using technology in imaginative and youthful ways to get young people excited about what they’re learning in school.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Women in Technology

    Kampala
    Uganda
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £43,872
    Image for Women in Technology WITU Business Hub
    Image for Women in Technology WITU Business Hub

    Project Summary

    Project

    WITU Business Hub

    Background

    In Uganda, many young girls drop out of school due to low family income. As a result, there are more illiterate women than men in Uganda. With an 82% youth unemployment rate, this leaves young Ugandan women particularly vulnerable.

    The Gist

    Women in Technology Uganda will build a tech employment and business hub to improve the career prospects of young women in Kampala, Uganda. A physical platform will be created for vulnerable young women to come together to access several services, including; IT training, tech-based employment and business incubation services (such as entrepreneurship training and office space for new businesses). The hub will also act as a central place for employers to recruit women into tech positions. 

    What Stood out for us?

    We were captivated by the prospect of supporting a new, locally run organisation to create Uganda's first tech employment and business hub for women. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Technoserve Uganda

    Central Region
    Uganda
    Jun 2013
    completed
    £50,000
    Image for Technoserve Uganda Girls’ Apprentice Programme
    Image for Technoserve Uganda Girls’ Apprentice Programme

    Project Summary

    Project

    Girls’ Apprentice Programme

    Background

    Uganda has the highest school dropout rate for females and the highest teenage pregnancy rate in sub-Saharan Africa. Young women are forced to raise families without sufficient skills to earn a living.

    The Gist

    30 vulnerable young women will be linked up with successful businesswomen who will mentor them and take them into their employment for 3-5 months as paid apprentices. They will receive on the job training; developing their experience of self-management and personal finance, and their personal confidence. It’s estimated 9% will have significantly increased their confidence. At least 30% will start a small home-based business and 20% will find employment with their new skills.

    What Stood out for us?

    We really like the connection that the project creates between vulnerable young women and successful female business leaders, and think that it will have a positive impact on both their lives.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Technoserve Uganda successfully piloted a new programme to equip vulnerable young women with skills and resources to start their own business or secure employment.

    The project recruited 30 young women in Uganda’s Central region who had dropped out of school, had little skills and were at risk of domestic violence. 50% had children.

    The young women were matched with a successful local businesswomen and received on the job training in a vocational trade at the entrepreneur's business. All received a monthly salary, most for the first time.

    As a result, nine of the young women now have decent jobs, while five run small businesses based on the skills they learnt.

    One Thing That Happened

    The connection between successful local businesswomen and the young women lay at the heart of the programme. The businesswomen mentored the young women, providing them with a relatable role model and inspiring them to achieve a better life.

    One Thing For Next Time

    Many of the young women faced psychological challenges that needed to be addressed before they could benefit fully from the programme. So, in future, TechnoServe will provide the young female participants with access to counselling.

    One Other Way We Supported

    This was a lesson for us. As Technoserve Uganda is part of a larger, very capable international organisation, we found ourselves focusing resources on our smaller partners. It was experiences like this that led us to exclusively support organisations that have just started out.

    Future Plans

    The success of the pilot enabled Technoserve to secure significant funding to scale the programme across Uganda. They’ll take all the juicy learning from the pilot to make it an even stronger programme.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Mac UK

    London
    UK
    Jun 2013
    in-progress
    £27,035
    Image for Mac UK Strengthening Foundations
    Image for Mac UK Strengthening Foundations

    Project Summary

    Project

    Strengthening Foundations

    Background

    One in three young people who offend have mental health difficulties. MAC-UK’s vision is to radically transform the delivery of mental health services for young people.

    The Gist

    MAC-UK face a major infrastructural challenge which is holding the organisation back.  Weak use of technology holds them back in terms of efficiency, which has a knock-on effect in terms of the impact they are able to have. This investment in their organisational infrastructure will allow them to scale their services and increase the number of young people reached in the next three years.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of strengthening MAC-UK as an organisation to successfully achieve its bold vision of making street based mental health work the status quo across the UK.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • KampaBits

    Uganda
    Uganda
    Jul 2014
    in-progress
    £28,064
    Image for KampaBits KampaBits Design Agency
    Image for KampaBits KampaBits Design Agency

    Project Summary

    Project

    KampaBits Design Agency

    Background

    Youth unemployment in Uganda is amongst the highest in Africa, particularly in informal settlements, making young people vulnerable to entering crime, joining gangs and being exploited or trafficked. However, the tech world is expanding in Uganda and learning digital skills is an exciting opportunity for young people, enabling them to gain a competitive edge in the job market and build a safe, sustainable future. Since starting in 2012, KampaBits has improved the livelihoods of vulnerable youth through developing their digital skills and helping them find high quality employment as designers and developers.

    The Gist

    The KampaBits Design Agency (KDA) will create employment for young Ugandans who have gone through their digital training programme, while generating income for KampaBits. KDA will offer quality yet affordable branding, web design and development to local companies, NGOs and government institutions. A business development manager will be recruited to lead the agency and the most talented KampaBits graduates will be employed to deliver the services.

    What Stood out for us?

    We think the impact KampaBits has on young people is amazing, so we're excited to help them become self sustaining and scalable, through their youth-led, entrepreneurial approach.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • EduKit

    London
    UK
    Jul 2014
    in-progress
    £43,000
    Image for EduKit Raising Attainment
    Image for EduKit Raising Attainment

    Project Summary

    Project

    Raising Attainment

    Background

    Evidence shows that extracurricular education benefits students hugely, helping to develop skills and positive character traits. Though there are thousands of impactful programmes available that are provided by social organisations, these are not being accessed by the people who need them the most. Schools are often unaware of what is available to their students, and so students miss out, and the programmes are left vastly under-subscribed.

    The Gist

    EduKit intelligently matches students in a personalised, systematic way to youth projects that are best suited to their needs and interests. They will be working with 25 schools, acting as a bridge between them and high quality, engaging programmes, and helping to raise the attainment of over 800 secondary school students. Once on a programme, each student’s progress with be monitored and findings will be fed back to teachers. Our support will also help EduKit launch EduKit online, which will give them the potential to extend their reach to thousands of students across the country.

    What Stood out for us?

    Many youth projects have the potential to have a huge impact, but they are not reaching the right young people. We think EduKit is an innovative solution that has the potential to transform the education of students across the UK.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • The Integrate Movement

    London
    UK
    Jul 2014
    in-progress
    £47,965
    Image for The Integrate Movement The Integrate Movement
    Image for The Integrate Movement The Integrate Movement

    Project Summary

    Project

    The Integrate Movement

    Background

    The landscape in the health and justice sectors is going through unprecedented change. There is a national urge to deliver more for less and many services are restructuring and radically changing the way they do things. MAC-UK has been approached to deliver training in its approaches both in and out of London and there is more demand than they have capacity to deliver.

    The Gist

    The Integrate Movement is a new social enterprise taking MAC-UK’s successful Integrate model and making street based mental health interventions the status quo at a national level. To achieve this, it will work with others to build a movement of organisations and institutions which take its work forward, wrapping mental health around all service provision.

    What Stood out for us?

    MAC-UK revolutionised the way that mental health services are provided for young people, and this is a chance to scale this and embed it across the country.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • iceaddis

    Addis Ababa
    Ethiopia
    Jul 2014
    in-progress
    £40,900
    Image for iceaddis iceaddis downtown hub
    Image for iceaddis iceaddis downtown hub

    Project Summary

    Project

    iceaddis downtown hub

    Background

    Addis Ababa is one of the most vibrant and fastest growing cities in the world, with a growing interest in technology and innovation. Yet the city lacks an ecosystem to support emerging tech entrepreneurs. In a country with growing youth unemployment it is critical to create this ecosystem as a successful tech start-up scene would create jobs for young people.

    The Gist

    iceaddis will launch Ethiopia's first tech hub in Addis Ababa. It will bring together technology developers, entrepreneurs and investors and create an inspiring environment for them to test their ideas and grow them into 10 businesses with high growth potential. Young entrepreneurs will be encouraged to experiment, and will be provided with work space, training, opportunities to collaborate with peers and connections to investors.

    What Stood out for us?

    We're excited that, as the country's first tech incubator, iceaddis is a catalyst to creating a strong tech start-up scene to support Ethiopia's emerging tech sector.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • AhadooTec

    Addis Ababa
    Ethiopia
    Dec 2015
    in-progress
    £9,000
    Image for AhadooTec Turbo Boosting AhadooTec
    Image for AhadooTec Turbo Boosting AhadooTec

    Project Summary

    Project

    Turbo Boosting AhadooTec

    Background

    Since January 2015, we have been supporting AhadooTec to develop Fidel, Ethiopia’s first free mobile learning platform for secondary schools. In the lead up to The Foundation winding down at the end of the year, we have decided to use our remaining funding to support several existing start-up partners we have a strong, trusted relationship with.

    The Gist

    Having developed the Fidel platform, added content, built key partnerships and launched it in a number of schools, Ahadoo now need to roll it out across more schools to generate income and scale. To do this, they need a bigger team. We are providing funding for them to hire two staff members: one to build and manage their partnerships with schools; the other to install and manage the Fidel system for schools.

    What Stood out for us?

    We see these roles as a crucial investment, helping AhadooTec to become financially sustainable and scale. Through building partnerships with paying schools, they will generate income, enabling them to strengthen and grow their team and platform, and ultimately, improve more students’ education. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Radar

    Countrywide
    Kenya
    Jul 2014
    in-progress
    £45,349.51
    Image for Radar From the Margins to the Front Page
    Image for Radar From the Margins to the Front Page

    Project Summary

    Project

    From the Margins to the Front Page

    Background

    Many young people feel marginalised, do not have a voice in society or are misrepresented by the media. This is a problem that is felt strongly by three communities; young people living in informal settlements in Kenya; young lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender people in Uganda, and young care leavers in the UK.

    The Gist

    Radar will support young people to have a voice across these communities in Kenya, Uganda and the UK. It will do this by establishing mobile citizen reporter networks for young people, providing them with mobile and digital skills, tools and platforms, so that they can make their voice heard on issues that matter to them. Over 130 young people will develop journalism skills, benefit from growing networks and mentors, and will be supported towards accessing further employment.

    What Stood out for us?

    We're excited that Radar could be a catalyst for change in the world of journalism, turning young people from stories into storytellers.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • PACEMaker International

    -
    Kenya
    Dec 2015
    in-progress
    £8,000
    Image for PACEMaker International Turbo Boosting PACEmaker International
    Image for PACEMaker International Turbo Boosting PACEmaker International

    Project Summary

    Project

    Turbo Boosting PACEmaker International

    Background

    Since January 2015, we have been supporting PACE to train secondary school graduates to be teaching assistants who are then placed in under resourced schools, improving primary school education and improving the graduates’ life chances. In the lead up to The Foundation winding down at the end of the year, we have decided to use our remaining funding to support several existing start-up partners we have a strong, trusted relationship with.

    The Gist

    PACE are progressing very quickly. They have already placed almost 100 graduates in schools, with both graduates and pupils progressing quickly, and leader Peggy receiving numerous accolades and awards for her work. Grabbing hold of all the great opportunity, the team is at full capacity, and is overstretched. So we are providing PACE with funding to bring on two new full time staff members to run their programmes, train and manage their volunteers, and build relationships with schools.

    What Stood out for us?

    This will create more capacity within the PACE team, meaning they can work with more schools, generating more income. This will help them to become financially sustainable and be in a position to scale across Kenya.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Green Biz

    Eldoret
    Kenya
    Dec 2015
    in-progress
    £10,000
    Image for Green Biz Turbo Boosting Green Biz
    Image for Green Biz Turbo Boosting Green Biz

    Project Summary

    Project

    Turbo Boosting Green Biz

    Background

    Since January 2014, we have been working with Tumaini, who support children living on the streets. We supported them to setup Green Biz, a social enterprise providing employment to youth living on the streets who collect plastic waste items which they shred, compress and sell it on to manufacturers. This serves as a platform to help them access further opportunities. In the lead up to The Foundation winding down at the end of the year, we have decided to use our remaining funding to support several existing start-up partners we have a strong, trusted relationship with.

    The Gist

    Green Biz is now sustaining itself financially. However, they are collecting and shredding more plastic that can be picked up by manufacturers. This limits the amount of money they are able to generate. We are therefore providing them with funding to buy a truck. This will enable Green Biz to sell 20 tonnes of plastic per month, compared to the 3-6 tonnes they are currently selling, at a minimum, quadrupling their income.  

    What Stood out for us?

    We love that this will increase Green Biz's income and profits so significantly, meaning they can provide greater opportunities to street youth and feed funding back into Tumaini Children’s Centre. Funding for a truck is virtually impossible to find, so we are delighted that we can provide this for them, given its projected long-term impact. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Tutors United

    London
    UK
    Jul 2014
    in-progress
    £36,000
    Image for Tutors United The At Home Tutoring Programme
    Image for Tutors United The At Home Tutoring Programme

    Project Summary

    Project

    The At Home Tutoring Programme

    Background

    The more money your parents earn, the more likely you are to be able to buy a better education and afford private tuition, which is proven to have huge benefits on academic attainment but is inaccessible to most young people. As a result, students from lower income households can be left behind, and can struggle particularly in the transition from primary to secondary school. University students facing the prospect of huge student debt and increasing youth unemployment, which is all the more challenging for young people from low income backgrounds.

    The Gist

    Tutors United is making private tutoring accessible to all young people, regardless of economic background. Their idea is pretty ingenious and their impact is two-fold; bringing together two groups of young people - one at the start and one at the end of their education - and significantly benefiting both. Tutors United will provide 250 primary school pupils with two years of affordable home tutoring from undergraduate students - each pupil will get 48 hours of private tuition each year. This will at the same time give 40 undergraduate students from low-income backgrounds two years' paid employment, training and individual mentoring - a great way to support their transition into a full time career.

    What Stood out for us?

    Tutors United has the potential to significantly decrease educational inequality and make private tuition accessible to all pupils.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Franklin Scholars

    London
    UK
    Jan 2014
    in-progress
    £21,863
    Image for Franklin Scholars Franklin Scholars
    Image for Franklin Scholars Franklin Scholars

    Project Summary

    Project

    Franklin Scholars

    Background

    The transition from primary to secondary school is a struggle, particularly for children from low-income families. It's a crucial time, influencing a student’s entire future.

    The Gist

    Franklin Scholars will be piloting a peer-to-peer teaching programme with 90 students in three schools.  45 Year 10 students will be supported in designing and delivering inventive weekly one-to-one tutoring sessions throughout the year, targeting 45 Year 7 students. 

    The idea is that the younger students will build confidence in their learning and resilience, and the older students will become ‘Franklin Scholars’, a stamp that will be endorsed by universities and employers.

    What Stood out for us?

    Piloting an exciting in-school project that supports young people at a challenging time in their lives, which we see as being highly replicable.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • icaddis

    Addis Ababa
    Ethiopia
    Dec 2015
    in-progress
    £10,000
    Image for icaddis Turbo Boosting iceaddis
    Image for icaddis Turbo Boosting iceaddis

    Project Summary

    Project

    Turbo Boosting iceaddis

    Background

    Since July 2014, we have been supporting iceaddis, Ethiopia’s first innovation hub. In that time, they have established a hub in central Addis Ababa, providing vital space, support, opportunities and a community for young creatives, techies, activists and entrepreneurs in Ethiopia. In the lead up to The Foundation winding down at the end of the year, we have decided to use our remaining funding to support several existing start-up partners we have a strong, trusted relationship with.

    The Gist

    iceaddis is already generating significant income by running events, workshops and hackathons, hiring out the space to likeminded organisations, and running a membership programme.  However, covering their rent is still difficult.  It is their biggest outgoing and, crucial to everything they do, but it is difficult to get funding for rent. We are providing icaeddis with £10,000 to cover their rent for four and a half months, enough time for them to break even, meaning they would be able to cover it themselves going forward.

    What Stood out for us?

    iceaddis is having an huge impact in Addis Ababa and we are delighted to be able to provide them with the support they need to keep the hub open for enough time for them become financially sustainable, ensuring that their impact on young lives will continue and grow.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Ahadoo

    Addis Ababa
    Ethiopia
    Nov 2014
    in-progress
    £33,450
    Image for Ahadoo Ethiopia's first mobile learning platform
    Image for Ahadoo Ethiopia's first mobile learning platform

    Project Summary

    Project

    Ethiopia's first mobile learning platform

    Background

    Only 40% of youth attend secondary school in Ethiopia. The quality of education for those who do attend school is poor - there is a lack of resources and learning materials, and classrooms are overcrowded. Crucially, current teaching practice places emphasis on being able to memorise rather than truly understand information.

    The Gist

    Ahadoo will launch Fidel, Ethiopia's first free mobile learning platform that will enable secondary school students far and wide to access quality learning materials - available both online and offline on any kind of device, including school computers and mobile phones.

    Fidel will make learning accessible and fun. Lots of quizzes and interaction amongst students and teachers will improve academic understanding and motivation to learn. Fidel will be used to support face-to-face learning and will help create greater communication between students and teachers.

    They expect to go from 5,000 users in their first 6 months to 50,000 users by the beginning of the next academic year. 

     

    What Stood out for us?

    Fidel is the very first mobile learning platform in Ethiopia. We were excited by its potential to shake up education and create a generation of tech savvy young Ethiopians.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Women in Technology Uganda

    -
    Uganda
    Dec 2015
    in-progress
    £9,000
    Image for Women in Technology Uganda Turbo Boosting WiTU
    Image for Women in Technology Uganda Turbo Boosting WiTU

    Project Summary

    Project

    Turbo Boosting WiTU

    Background

    Since January 2014, we have been supporting Women in Technology Uganda (WiTU) to train up young women in ICT, entrepreneurship and life skills. In the lead up to The Foundation winding down at the end of the year, we have decided to use our remaining funding to support several existing start-up partners we have a strong, trusted relationship with.

    The Gist

    Since 2014, WiTU has successfully opened a fully equipped physical hub in Kampala and trained hundreds of young women from around the city. They want to support young women who live in rural Uganda, for whom opportunities are much harder to come by. They do not currently have resources to do remote training. So we are providing them with funding to buy 30 laptops and to cover the full costs of running a pilot remote training programme for rural women, ensuring that they have better life chances.

    What Stood out for us?

    Rural women get far fewer opportunities that those in the city. This also has the potential to transform subsistence farming, currently common practice, into agribusiness through training women farmers in business and ICT skills. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • KampaBits

    Kampala
    Uganda
    Dec 2015
    in-progress
    £4,000
    Image for KampaBits Turbo Boosting KampaBits
    Image for KampaBits Turbo Boosting KampaBits

    Project Summary

    Project

    Turbo Boosting KampaBits

    Background

    Since July 2014, we have been supporting KampaBits to set up the KampaBits Design Agency (KDA), creating employment for young Ugandans who’ve gone through their tech training programme, while generating income for KampaBits. In the lead up to The Foundation winding down at the end of the year, we have decided to use our remaining funding to support several existing start-up partners we have a strong, trusted relationship with.

    The Gist

    KDA has built a team, brand and a website and has started to build up their client base. However, they are spending too much time and money printing design work they create for clients, including brochures, leaflets and posters. This is stopping them from being able to produce as much work as they could.  So we are providing them with funding to buy a high quality digital printer, enabling them to do all their printing in house, cutting down the time it takes to print their work, and vastly reduce the cost.

    What Stood out for us?

    This investment will help KDA generate significant income, meaning they could begin to scale their business and put more funding back into the core KampaBits training programme for vulnerable young people. 

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • PACEMaker International

    -
    Kenya
    Nov 2014
    in-progress
    £31, 901
    Image for PACEMaker International PACEMaker International
    Image for PACEMaker International PACEMaker International

    Project Summary

    Project

    PACEMaker International

    Background

    In Kenya there's a 9 month period between leaving secondary school and starting university that's often not productively used. These secondary school graduates often arrive at University or employment underprepared with little real experience. Secondly, many schools in Kenya are massively under resourced, with as many as 52 students to one teacher in a classroom.

    The Gist

    PACEMaker International will train 100 bright young secondary school graduates to become teaching assistants and then put them into under resourced schools. There's a dual benefit - graduates gain solid work experience and skills which will help them to become much more employable; at the same time they will improve the quality of education and level of indvidualised support for students in the classroom.

    What Stood out for us?

    The dual benefit of this model makes it a no brainer.  It will have a huge impact not only on the young people who become teaching assistants but also on the students attending the schools they go into.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Box Up Crime

    London
    UK
    Nov 2014
    in-progress
    £26, 896
    Image for Box Up Crime Box Up Crime
    Image for Box Up Crime Box Up Crime

    Project Summary

    Project

    Box Up Crime

    Background

    Existing systems of isolating and expelling challenging students in schools don't work. Rather than being supported students are sidelined, making it easy for them to fall into crime. And, it costs schools £14,000 to exclude one student and which costs taxpayer £21 million each year.

    The Gist

    Box Up Crime is an in-school boxing and mentoring scheme that supports young people who are at risk of expulsion. It's a year long programme for twelve to fifteen year olds, combining mentoring and education. It improves attendance and attitudes within the classroom, and will reduce the number of expulsions and offending rates outside of school.

    They will run a pilot throughout one school and then expand to all nine secondary schools in Barking and Dagenham by December 2015, with a view to scaling across the UK in future. In addition, 30 young people will be trained to run the programme, gaining qualifications and valuable work experience.

    What Stood out for us?

    Boxing as a tool to support those at risk of offending is not new. However, there's no existing programme that goes into schools and reaches students much earlier on, preventing them from falling into a cycle that all too often leads to crime.   

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Digital Opportunity Trust

    Nationwide
    Ethiopia
    Dec 2012
    completed
    £48,530
    Image for Digital Opportunity Trust ListenUp! Ethiopia (Raiy Radio Show)
    Image for Digital Opportunity Trust ListenUp! Ethiopia (Raiy Radio Show)

    Project Summary

    Project

    ListenUp! Ethiopia (Raiy Radio Show)

    Background

    Youth unemployment is endemic in Ethiopia. 75% of young people are currently out of work. Tapping into the potential of the growing private sector is key, yet young people lack the knowledge to do so. Radio, the single most important method of communication in Ethiopia, offers a ways to reach young people with this knowledge.

    The Gist

    DOT will pilot a national radio show to provide one million young listeners with critical information related to starting up a business and getting work. The radio shows will be created and presented by young people. ListenUp! will be informal and interactive, with a phone-in component and real-time social media engagement during broadcasts. If successful, the programme will be replicated in other countries.

    What Stood out for us?

    The prospect of helping a large number of Ethiopia’s young people through an exciting youth-led venture.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Digital Opportunity Trust Ethiopia launched a new national radio programme, named Frank ('coin' in the local Amharic language) to provide young people with business support that they wouldn’t otherwise have been able to receive.
     
    Frank was aired 26 times for 20 minutes on Radio Fana to 3.7m listeners to Ethiopia's capital Addis and in the south of the country. Frank increased listener’s knowledge in several areas, including business idea generation, basic business planning, financial management and business ethics. 

    One Thing That Happened

    DOT provided individual support to several listeners - like the group of 22 young people we met who'd been disabled from polio. DOT's staff regularly visited them to give advice and help them to establish a growing mushroom business. 

    One Thing For Next Time

    This one's a learning for us. We didn't provide DOT Ethiopia with our usual package of expertise and connections to compliment our funding. We overstretched ourselves by working with too many organisations. We decided to work with fewer organisations so we can provide them with intensive support.

    One Other Way We Supported

    We championed DOT to our friends at Zing Foundation and they decided to support DOT to establish a new programme in London.  

    Future Plans

    DOT Ethiopia are looking for additional funding to continue Frank, while also exploring ways in which the radio programme could be financially self-sustainable.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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  • Sanergy

    Nairobi
    Kenya
    Jun 2013
    completed
    £50,000
    Image for Sanergy Fresh life for the fresh generation
    Image for Sanergy Fresh life for the fresh generation

    Project Summary

    Project

    Fresh life for the fresh generation

    Background

    In the Mukuru slum, Nairobi, 80% of residents lack access to hygienic sanitation. Diarrheal disease kills 1.6 million children each year. An untapped resource exists to help solve this problem in the form of 40% of Makuru’s young people who are currently unemployed.

    The Gist

    Young people in the Mukuru slum will build and operate 40 Fresh Life Sanitation facilities. They will receive intensive business and marketing training on how to generate demand and maintain high standards of cleanliness. The project will result in 40 good, lasting jobs for young people, 2000 people receiving affordable and lasting hygienic sanitation, and 300 tons of waste per year being safely removed. More broadly, the youth operators will be at the forefront of the Fresh Life franchise innovations, cultivating a social entrepreneurial spirit in Mukuru youth.

    What Stood out for us?

    We think that Sanergy’s model for tackling sanitation and unemployment is very scalable, and we want to help to prove this in their early days.

    How It Went

    The Impact

    Sanergy supported 40 young people to launch 71 Fresh Life businesses, providing a decent livelihood for themselves and for others they employed.

    The youth, Like Fresh Life Operator, George serve 2000 customers per day, ensuring that Sanergy’s waste collection services remove 5 metric tonnes of waste from their communities they live in.

    We met with Rhoda (below), a 19 year old mother of two who used a loan to buy a Fresh Life toilet. Rhoda is making $4 a day from the toilet from between 60 and 90 users. Rhoda has already paid the loan she used to buy the toilet and is about to franchise another toilet. As well as providing her with income for the present, Rhoda is now saving money to put her children through school.  

    One Thing That Happened

    Forward3D's Jonathan (pictured below) travelled out to Kenya to help Sanergy better use data. Jonathan determined which factors influenced the average number of users per day to create a statistical model capable of accurately predicting the number of users a proposed toilet could expect. Read Jonathan's blog making decisions with data to find out more.

    One Thing For Next Time

    Securing land to house the toilet is the biggest challenge the Fresh Life entrepreneurs face. Several people who Sanergy trained weren't then able to launch their toilet business because they didn't have access to land. In future, the toilet entrepreneurs will make sure people have land first before starting their programme. 

    One Other Way We Supported

    While visiting in December 2013, we provided communications support; through photography and video production

    Future Plans

    Sanergy now have a much better understanding of how to work with young people. They are successfully scaling and have now launched over 500 Fresh Life Toilets. They remain determined to ensure that everyone in the informal settlements of Nairobi and beyond has access to a clean toilet.

Meet some of the people we have worked with along the way. Read their stories.

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